Responsible Investing

June 09, 2009

Domini officials contributed two chapters to Finance for a Better World: The Shift Toward Sustainability, a new book on sustainable investing published by Palgrave Macmillan. The two chapters focus on how socially responsible investing can address short-term thinking in our financial markets and improve corporate human rights performance, respectively.

Steve Lydenberg, Domini's Chief Investment Officer, argues that socially responsible investing can remedy the short-term thinking that has plagued our financial markets. "An excessive focus on short-term profits has various detrimental effects," writes Lydenberg. "It causes corporate managers to misallocate assets. It introduces dangerous volatility into financial markets. It means society must divert productive resources to repairing environmental and social damage done in the headlong pursuit of profits." Lydenberg suggests that social investing, with its focus on long-term social and environmental sustainability, can help to refocus finance on the long-term.

Adam Kanzer, Domini's Managing Director and General Counsel, draws on his experience as the head of Domini's shareholder activism program in a chapter examining the use of shareholder proposals to address corporate human rights performance. His chapter outlines the legal basis for these proposals and shows how nonbinding shareholder proposals have successfully influenced corporate behavior even when they fall far short of a majority vote. He points out, for example, that the shareholder proposals that helped bring Reverend Leon Sullivan to the Board of General Motors received less than 3% of the vote. Sullivan later authored the Sullivan Principles to guide businesses in apartheid-era South Africa, which played an important role in ending apartheid.

According to its publisher, Finance for a Better World "provides an overview of current advances regarding the integration of sustainability in the financial sector. Its originality lies in the fact that it does not focus exclusively on a particular aspect of this emerging trend, but instead, presents various illustrations — or instance in the fields of SRI, sustainable banking or innovative investments — of what can be considered as the beginning of a paradigm shift in global finance."

The book was edited by Henri-Claude de Bettignies, the EU Chair Distinguished Professor of Global Governance and China-Europe Business Relations at CEIBS, Shanghai, China and François Lépineux, a Research Fellow at INSEAD, and Professor and Head of the Center for Responsible Business at ESC Rennes School of Business, Brittany, France.

April 02, 2009

Steven Lydenberg 

From Finance for a Better World: The Shift Toward Sustainability (Palgrave Macmillan, April 2009) 

December 03, 2008

Steven Lydenberg 

 (Earthscan, December 2008) 

May 16, 2007

Amy Domini

GreenMoney Journal, May/June 2007

September 20, 2002

Steven Lydenberg

Originally Appeared in the Journal of Corporate Citizenship (Autumn 2002)

Within the past five years, socially responsible investing ( SRI ) along with the related discipline of corporate social responsibility ( CSR ) have attracted worldwide attention. The strong momentum behind these two movements implies that they will soon work their way into the mainstream of the financial and corporate worlds. Much needs to happen, however, before they are fully integrated...

Click here to read the full article (PDF).

June 29, 2002

Amy Domini, CEO and Founder

In 2002, Amy looked to the future of socially responsible investing, noting that we stood at a tipping point in history.

April 18, 2002

New York, NY – Domini Social Investments, manager of the Domini Social Equity Fund (NASDAQ: DSEFX), the nation's oldest and largest socially responsible index fund, announced today that it has filed nine shareholder resolutions for the 2002 proxy season and is engaged in ten separate dialogues with companies on a range of social and environmental issues.
 
"Responsible investing requires responsible ownership," said Amy Domini, Founder and a Managing Principal of Domini Social Investments. "By filing shareholder proposals on social and environmental issues, and through constructive dialogue with companies, we are helping to make corporations more accountable to their stockholders, employees, communities and the environment."
 
Several of Domini's 2002 shareholder initiatives involve the sweatshop issue, on which the firm has been active for a number of years. In addition to filing shareholder resolutions with The Gap (NYSE: GPS) and Sears, Roebuck (NYSE: S) this season, Domini is also engaged in dialogue with The Walt Disney Co. (NYSE: DIS), McDonald's (NYSE: MCD) and Nordstrom (NYSE: JWN) regarding international labor standards. Domini's resolution with The Gap (NYSE: GPS) was withdrawn when the company agreed to work with Domini and other concerned investors to explore the development of assessment methods for benchmarking and reporting vendor compliance activities and progress. Also as a result of dialogues, McDonald's has produced its first public report on its vendor standards compliance program, and Nordstrom recently announced that it would be adding "freedom of association" to its global code of conduct.
 
Domini's 2002 shareholder activism initiatives also focus on environmental issues. Domini's two-year dialogue with Merrill Lynch (NYSE: MER) about the social and environmental impacts of Merrill's investments showed signs of progress when Merrill's CEO & Chairman cited China's Three Gorges Dam at the recent World Economic Forum Summit in New York. "One important goal of our dialogue has been realized - our concerns about the disastrous impacts of this dam have been raised to the highest levels of the firm," said Adam Kanzer, Director of Shareholder Advocacy at Domini Social Investments. Domini also initiated a dialogue with Procter & Gamble (NYSE: PG) asking the company to refrain from using old growth timber and to set goals for using recycled content in popular paper products such as Bounty paper towels and Charmin bath tissue.
 
Domini was a co-filer this year on resolutions calling on The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) to report on progress in meeting beverage container recycling goals, and on Pepsi Co. (NYSE: PEP) to adopt a comprehensive recycling policy. Coca-Cola has agreed to increase the recycled content in its plastic bottles and participated in a project, along with recycling companies, environmental organizations and government agencies, to comprehensively evaluate recycling opportunities throughout the beverage container value chain. Pepsi recently followed Coca-Cola's lead by announcing that it would begin including recycled content in its plastic bottles sold in the United States.
 
Domini is also working to encourage corporations to improve the way they treat their employees. For the second consecutive year, Domini is asking AT&T (NYSE: T) to revise its employee pension plan so as not to discriminate against longer-term employees. Domini also co-sponsored a resolution with Emerson (NYSE: EMR) for the second consecutive year, asking it to adopt a written policy barring discrimination based on sexual orientation. The Emerson resolution received 10.2% of the shareholder vote at the company's annual meeting on February 5, ensuring the right to return to Emerson for a third year with this issue.
 
Domini also co-filed a resolution with Cooper Industries (NYSE: CBE) to issue annual sustainability reports; with Household International (NYSE: HI) asking it to link executive pay to progress on eliminating predatory lending practices; and with Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ), concerning the firm's global code of conduct. This resolution was withdrawn after the firm committed to a dialogue with proponents. The Cooper Industries resolution received a very strong 21.85% vote at their annual meeting on April 5. Management has agreed to meet with proponents.
 
In addition to filing shareholder resolutions and initiating dialogues with companies, Domini has been extremely active on shareholder disclosure issues of late. Three years ago, the firm became the first mutual fund manager in America to publish its proxy votes. Last December, Domini filed a Petition for Rulemaking with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), urging adoption of a rule requiring all mutual funds to publicly disclose their proxy votes. The firm also recently revised its Proxy Voting Guidelines to emphasize greater corporate transparency on auditor independence and other issues.
 
"We think mutual fund shareholders have a right to know how their shares are voted on important issues of corporate governance and social and environmental responsibility," says Ms. Domini. "In light of revelations about corporate practices at Enron and other companies, where small groups of management insiders seemed more interested in self-enrichment than in benefiting shareholders, we think shareholder vigilance and increased corporate transparency are more important than ever."
 
Domini Social Investments manages more than $1.8 billion in assets for individual and institutional investors seeking to create positive change by integrating social and environmental values into their investment decisions. Its flagship fund, the Domini Social Equity Fund, was the first socially and environmentally screened index fund and is the nation's largest socially responsible index fund. The Fund includes companies with positive records in community involvement, the environment, diversity and employee relations, and excludes companies deriving significant revenues from alcohol, tobacco, gambling, nuclear power and weapons contracting. In addition to the Domini Social Equity Fund, the company also offers the Domini Social Bond Fund (NASDAQ: DSBFX) and an FDIC-insured money market account (in partnership with ShoreBank), both of which focus on community economic development.
 
Domini is working with a number of concerned investor groups and non-governmental organizations on its 2002 shareholder initiatives, including the As You Sow Foundation, Friends of the Earth, the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility, the International Rivers Network, the National Wildlife Federation, the Pride Foundation, Walden Asset Management, and a number of large institutional investors, including the General Board of Pension and Health Benefits of the United Methodist Church.
 
For additional information on Domini's shareholder activism and proxy voting initiatives, information on the Domini Funds, or a free copy of the firm's 44 page Proxy Voting Guidelines & Shareholder Activism booklet, call (800) 762-6814, or visit the firm's web site www.domini.com.

March 22, 2002

Over the past several days we have received requests from concerned shareholders for information about ourHewlett Packard – Compaq merger vote. After a careful reevaluation of the various issues involved, Domini Social Investments reversed its prior position, and voted against this merger.

This was an extremely difficult decision to make. Both Hewlett Packard and Compaq pass our social and environmental screens and are included in the Domini Social Equity Fund's portfolio. Although aspects of the deal impressed us, in the end we decided that the merger was problematic for both financial and social reasons.

In general, we approach mergers with caution, as they are often made at the expense of employees, communities and shareholders. In this case, we did not find financial reasons substantial enough to overcome these social concerns.

We greatly value input from our shareholders. If you have any further questions, please send us an email or call us at 1-800-582-6757.

March 21, 2002

New York, NY – Domini Social Investments, manager of the Domini Social Equity Fund (NASDAQ: DSEFX), announced today the publication of its seventh annual Proxy Voting Guidelines and Shareholder Activism booklet.  Three years ago, the firm became the first mutual fund company in America to publish the actual votes it casts for each company in its portfolios.   Most of the nation's mutual funds do not publish proxy-voting guidelines or disclose how they vote on particular issues at annual shareholder meetings.
 
 "We think mutual fund shareholders have a right to know how we intend to vote their shares on important issues of corporate governance and social and environmental responsibility," said Amy Domini, Founder and a Managing Principal of Domini Social Investments.  "In light of the Enron fiasco, we think increased disclosure and transparency are more important than ever."
 
Domini's Proxy Voting Guidelines describe the firm's voting policy on more than 95 types of corporate resolutions ranging from environmental reporting to executive compensation to labor relations at home and abroad.  The firm updates the Guidelines on an annual basis to address emerging issues.  The 2002 Guidelines include new proxy-voting policies aimed at supporting auditor independence, curbing executive compensation and requiring in-person annual shareholder meetings.  Some companies have attempted to replace in-person shareholder meetings with online meetings, a practice that Domini believes would diminish shareholder influence and reduce accountability on the part of corporate managers.  In addition, Domini has adopted new proxy-voting policies supporting the issuance of corporate sustainability reports and the phasing out of mercury-containing devices.
 
Several revisions to this year's Guidelines concern issues that arose during the Enron scandal:
 
Domini revised the Guidelines to provide that it will vote "No" on corporate resolutions proposing the appointment of auditors who are not sufficiently "independent," in order to avoid conflicts of interest such as those that arose in the Enron-Andersen relationship.
 
"The Enron-Andersen scandal clearly demonstrates that conflicts can arise when accounting firms provide collateral consulting services to the companies they audit," said Ms. Domini. "We know these conflicts of interest can be disastrous for shareholders, employees and the public.  Henceforth, we will vote our proxies against all proposals to appoint auditors who are not sufficiently independent. We will also support shareholder resolutions requesting that these functions be performed by separate firms."
 
Domini also revised its Guidelines to provide that it will support resolutions tying executive compensation, and specifically stock options, to corporate performance.  "Shareholders need to take action to prevent future Enrons, where corporate managers enriched themselves while Enron's employees and other shareholders saw their shares plummet," continued Ms. Domini.  "Tying management stock options to corporate performance is one way to accomplish this, and we intend to support such efforts."
 
Finally, Domini tightened its guidelines regarding independence on corporate Boards of Directors as well.  Domini will now withhold its support for board slates that do not consist of a majority of independent directors, and will oppose the nomination of company insiders to key committees, such as the audit and nominating committees.  Domini has had a long-standing policy of opposing board slates that do not include women or people of color.
 
Domini's Proxy Voting Guidelines & Shareholder Activism booklet is distributed free of charge and is posted on the firm's website (www.domini.com).  The booklet also contains a historical overview of the firm's shareholder activism program, detailing how Domini has leveraged its shares to influence corporations to improve their social and environmental performance. The firm has filed more than 60 shareholder resolutions with more than 30 corporations over the past nine years. Visitors to the web site can also choose any of the 400 companies in the Domini Social Equity Fund's portfolio, see a brief description of the issue being voted on, and view Domini's vote. The web site is updated periodically as proxy materials for each company become available. The firm's policy is to post its votes approximately two weeks prior to each company's annual meeting.
 
Domini Social Investments manages more than $1.9 billion in assets for individual and institutional investors seeking to create positive change by integrating social and environmental values into their investment decisions.  Its flagship fund, the Domini Social Equity Fund, was the first socially and environmentally screened index fund and is the nation's largest socially responsible index fund.  The Fund includes companies with positive records in community involvement, the environment, diversity and employee relations, and excludes companies deriving significant revenues from alcohol, tobacco, gambling, nuclear power and weapons contracting.  In addition to the Domini Social Equity Fund, the company also offers the Domini Social Bond Fund (NASDAQ: DSBFX) and the Domini Money Market Account, an FDIC-insured money market account (in partnership with ShoreBank), both of which focus on community economic development.
 
Investors seeking additional information on the Fund, or a free copy of the firm's 44 page Proxy Voting Guidelines & Shareholder Activism booklet, may call 1-800- 762-6814, or visit the firm's web site (www.domini.com).  The Guidelines were developed in cooperation with Domini Social Investments' social research providers at KLD Research & Analtyics, Inc. (KLD) of Boston, Massachusetts, with assistance from the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility.

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